背景:
阅读英语

2012年6月英语六级真题及答案

[日期:07-09] 来源:网络  作者:未知 [字体: ]

2012年英语六级真题及答案

 

  快速阅读

  Google's plan for world's biggest online library: philanthropy or act of piracy?

  Google has already scanned 10 million books in its bid to digitise the contents of the world's major libraries, but a copyright battle now threatens the project, with Amazon and Microsoft joining authors and publishers opposed to the scheme.

  In recent years the world's most venerable libraries have played host to some incongruous visitors. In dusty nooks and far-flung stacks, teams of workers dispatched by Google have been beavering away to make digital copies of books. So far, Google has scanned more than 10 million titles from libraries in America and Europe - including half a million volumes held by the Bodleian in Oxford. The exact method it uses is unclear; the company does not allow outsiders to observe the process.

  Why is Google undertaking such a venture, so seemingly out-of-kilter with its snazzy, hi-tech image? Why is it even interested in all those out-of-print library books, most of which have been gathering dust on forgotten shelves for decades? The company claims its motives are essentially public-spirited. Its overall mission, after all, is to "organise the world's information", so it would be odd if that information did not include books. Like the Ancient Egyptians who attempted to build a library at Alexandria containing all the known world's scrolls, Google executives talk of constructing a universal online archive, a treasure trove of knowledge that will be freely available - or at least freely searchable - for all.

  The company likes to present itself as having lofty, utopian aspirations. "This really isn't about making money" is a mantra. "We are doing this for the good of society." As Santiago de la Mora, head of Google Books for Europe, puts it: "By making it possible to search the millions of books that exist today, we hope to expand the frontiers of human knowledge."

  Dan Clancy, the chief architect of Google Books, offers an analogy with the invention of the Gutenberg press - Google's book project, he says, will have a similar democratising effect. He talks of people in far-flung parts being able to access knowledge as never before, of search queries leading them to the one, long out-of-print book they need.

  And he does seem genuine in his conviction that this is primarily a philanthropic exercise. "Google's core business is search and find, so obviously what helps improve Google's search engine is good for Google," he says. "But we have never built a spreadsheet outlining the financial benefits of this, and I have never had to justify the amount I am spending to the company's founders."

  It is easy, talking to Clancy and his colleagues, to be swept along by their missionary zeal. But Google's book-scanning project is proving controversial. Several opponents have recently emerged, ranging from rival tech giants such as Microsoft and Amazon to small bodies representing authors and publishers across the world. In broad terms, these opponents have levelled two sets of criticisms at Google.

  First, they have questioned whether the primary responsibility for digitally archiving the world's books should be allowed to fall to a commercial company. In a recent essay in the New York Review of Books, Robert Darnton, the head of Harvard University's library, argued that because such books are a common resource - the possession of us all - only public, not-for-profit bodies should be given the power to control them.

  The second, related criticism is that Google's scanning of books is actually illegal. This allegation has led to Google becoming mired in a legal battle whose scope and complexity makes the Jarndyce and Jarndyce case in Bleak House look straightforward.

  At its centre, however, is one simple issue: that of copyright. The inconvenient fact about most books, to which Google has arguably paid insufficient attention, is that they are protected by copyright. Copyright laws differ from country to country, but in general protection extends for the duration of an author's life and for a substantial period afterwards, thus allowing the author's heirs to benefit. (In Britain and America, this post-death period is 70 years.) This means, of course, that almost all of the books published in the 20th century are still under copyright - and last century saw more books published than in all previous centuries combined. Of the roughly 40 million books in US libraries, for example, an estimated 32 million are in copyright. Of these, some 27 million are out of print.

  Outside the US, Google has made sure only to scan books that are out of copyright and thus in the "public domain" (works such as the Bodleian's first edition of Middlemarch, which anyone can read for free on Google Books Search).

  But, within the US, the company has scanned both in-copyright and out-of-copyright works. In its defence, Google points out that it displays only snippets of books that are in copyright - arguing that such displays are "fair use". But critics allege that by making electronic copies of these books without first seeking the permission of copyright holders, Google has committed piracy.

  "The key principle of copyright law has always been that works can be copied only once authors have expressly given their permission," says Piers Blofeld, of the Sheil Land literary agency in London. "Google has reversed this - it has simply copied all these works without bothering to ask."

  In 2005, the Authors Guild of America, together with a group of US publishers and publishers, launched a class action suit against Google that, after more than two years of wrangling, ended with an announcement last October that Google and the claimants had reached an out-of-court settlement. The full details are staggeringly complicated - the text alone runs to 385 pages - and trying to summarise it is no easy task. "Part of the problem is that it is basically incomprehensible," says Blofeld, one of the settlement's most vocal British critics.

  Broadly, the deal provides a mechanism for Google to reimburse authors and publishers whose rights it has breached (including giving them a share of any future revenue it generates from their works). In exchange for this, the rights holders agree not to sue Google in future.

  The settlement stipulates that a body known as the Books Rights Registry will represent the interests of US copyright holders. Authors and publishers with a copyright interest in a book scanned by Google who make themselves known to the registry will be entitled to receive a payment - in the region of $60 per book - as compensation.

  Additionally, the settlement hands Google the power - but only with the agreement of individual rights holders - to exploit its database of out-of-print books. It can include them in subscription deals sold to libraries or sell them individually under a consumer licence. It is these commercial provisions that are proving the settlement's most controversial aspect.

  Critics point out that, by giving Google the right to commercially exploit its database, the settlement paves the way for a subtle shift in the company's role from provider of information to seller. "Google's business model has always been to provide information for free, and sell advertising on the basis of the traffic this generates," points out James Grimmelmann, associate professor at New York Law School. Now, he says, because of the settlement's provisions, Google could become a significant force in bookselling.

  Interest in this aspect of the settlement has focused on "orphan" works, where there is no known copyright holder - these make up an estimated 5% to 10% of the books Google has scanned. Under the settlement, when no rights holders come forward and register their interest in a work, commercial control automatically reverts to Google. Google will be able to display up to 20% of orphan works for free, include them in its subscription deals to libraries and sell them to individual buyers under the consumer licence.

  "The deal has in effect handed Google a swath of intellectual copyright. It is a mammoth potential bookselling market," says Blofeld. He adds it is no surprise that Amazon, which currently controls 90% of the digital books market, is becoming worried.

  But Dan Clancy of Google dismisses the idea that, by gaining control over out-of-print and orphan works, Google is securing for itself a significant future revenue stream. He points out that out-of-print books represent only a tiny fraction of the books market - between 1% and 2%. "This idea that we are gaining access to a vast market here - I really don't think that is true."

  James Gleick, an American science writer and member of the Authors Guild, broadly agrees. He says that, although Google's initial scanning of in-copyright books made him uncomfortable, the settlement itself is a fair deal for authors.

  "The thing that needs to be emphasised is that this so-called market over which Google is being given dominance - the market in out-of-print books - doesn't currently exist. That's why they're out of print. In real life, I can't see what the damage is - it's only good."

  It is by no means certain that the settlement will be enacted - it is the subject of a fairness hearing in the US courts. But if it is enacted, Google will in effect be off the hook as far as copyright violations in the US are concerned. Many people are seriously concerned by this - and the company is likely to face challenges in other courts around the world.

  Over the coming months, we will hear a lot more about the Google settlement and its ramifications. Although it's a subject that may seem obscure and specialised, it concerns one of the biggest issues affecting publishing and, indeed, other creative industries - the control of digital rights.

  No one knows the precise use Google will make of the intellectual property it has gained by scanning the world's library books, and the truth, as Gleick points out, is that the company probably doesn't even know itself. But what is certain is that, in some way or another, Google's entrance into digital bookselling will have a significant impact on the book world in years to come.

  听力

  Section A

  Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations and2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation, one or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre.

  11.

  M: I don’t know what to do. I have to drive to Chicago next Friday for my cousin’s wedding, but I have got a Psychology test to prepare for.

  W: Why don’t you record your notes so you can study on the way?

  Q: What does the woman suggest the man do?

  12.

  M: Professor Wright, you may have to find another student to play this role, the lines are so long and I simply can’t remember them all.

  W: Look, Tony. It is still a long time before the first show. I don’t expect you to know all the lines yet. Just keep practicing.

  Q: What do we learn from the conversation?

  13.

  M: Hello, this is Dr. Martin from the Emergency Department. I have a male patient with a fractured ankle.

  W: Oh, we have one bed available in ward 3, send him here and I will take care of him.

  Q: What are the speakers talking about?

  14.

  W: Since Simon will graduate this May, the school paper needs a new editor. So if you are interested, I will be happy to nominate you.

  M: Thanks for considering me. But the baseball team is starting up a new season. And I’m afraid I have a lot on my hands.

  Q: What does the man mean?

  15. W: Have you heard the news that Jame Smeil has resigned his post as prime minister?

  M: Well, I got it from the headlines this morning. It’s reported that he made public at this decision at the last cabinet meeting.

  Q: what do we learn about Jame Smeil?

  16. W: The morning paper says the space shuttle is taking off at 10 a.m. tomorrow.

  M: Yeah, it’s just another one of this year’s routine missions. The first mission was undertaken a decade ago and broadcast live then worldwide.

  Q: what can we infer from this conversation?

  17. M: We do a lot of camping in the mountains. What would you recommend for two people?

  W: You’d probably be better off with the four real drive vehicle. We have several off-road trucks in stock, both new and used.

  Q: Where does the conversation most probably take place?

  18. W: I hear you did some serious shopping this past weekend.

  M: Yeah, the speakers of my old stereo finally gave out and there was no way to repair them.

  Q: What did the man do over the weekend?

  Conversation One

  W: Now, could you tell me where the idea for the business first came from?

  M: Well, the original shop was opened by a retired printer by the name of Gruby. Mr Gruby being left-handed himself, thought of the idea to try to promote a few products for left-handers.

  W: And how did he then go about actually setting up the business?

  M: Well, he looked for any left-handed products that might already be on the market which were very few. And then contacted the manufactures with the idea of having products produced for him, mainly in the scissors range to start with.

  W: Right. So you do commission some part of your stock.

  M: Yes, very much so. About 75 percent of our stock is specially made for us.

  W: And the rest of it?

  M: Hmm, the rest of it now, some 25, 30 years after Mr. Gruby’s initial efforts, there are more left-handed product actually on the market. Manufactures are now beginning to see that there is a market for left-handed products.

  W: And what’s the range of your stock?

  M: The range consists of a variety of scissors from children scissors to scissors for tailors, hairdressers etc. We also have a large range of kitchen ware.

  W: What’s the competition like? Do you have quite a lot of competition?

  M: There are other people in the business now in specialists, but only as mail-order outlets. But we have a shop here in central London plus a mail-order outlet. And we are without any doubt the largest supplier of the left-handed items.

  Q19: What kind of business does the man engaged in?

  Q20: What does the man say about his stock of products?

  Q21: What does the man say about other people in his line of business?

  Conversation Two

  M: Can we make you an offer? We would like to run the campaign for four extra weeks.

  W: well, can we summarize the problem from my point of view? First of all, the campaign was late. It missed two important trade affairs. The ads also did not appear into key magazines. As a result, the campaign failed. Do you accept that summary of what happened?

  M: well, the delay wasn’t entirely our fault. You did in fact make late changes to the specifications of the advertisements.

  W: Uh, actually, you were late with the initial proposals so you have very little time and in fact, we only asked for small changes.

  M: Well whatever, can we repeat our offer to run the campaign for 4 extra weeks?

  W: That’s not really the point. The campaign missed two key trade affairs. Because of this, we are asking you either to repeat the campaign next year for free, or we only pay 50% of the fee for this year.

  M: Could we suggest a 20% reduction to the fee together with the four week sustention to the campaign.

  W: We are not happy. We lost business.

  M: I think we both made mistakes. The responsibility is on both sides.

  W: Ok, let’s suggest a new solution. How about a 40% cut in fee, or a free repeat campaign?

  M: Well, let’s take a break, we’re not getting very far. Perhaps we should think about this.

  22: What do we learn about the man’s company?

  23: Why was the campaign delayed according to the man?

  24: What does the woman propose as a solution to the problem?

  25: What does the man suggest they do at the end of the conversation?

  Section B

  Passage One

  The University of Tennessee’s Walters Life Sciences building, is a model animal facility, spotlessly clean, careful in obtaining prior approval for experiments from an animal care committee. Of the 15,000 mice house there in a typical year, most give their lives for humanity. These are good mice and as such won the protection of the animal care committee. At any given time however some mice escape and run free. These mice are pests. They can disrupt experiments with the bacteria organisms they carry. They are bad mice and must be captured and destroyed. Usually, this is accomplished by means of sticky traps, a kind of fly paper on which they become increasingly stuck. But the real point of the cautionary tale, says animal behaviorist Herzau, is that the labels we put on things can affect our moral responses to them. Using stick traps or the more deadly snap traps would be deemed unacceptable for good mice. Yet the killing of bad mice requires no prior approval. Once the research animal hits the floor and becomes an escapee, says Herza, its moral standard is instantly diminished. In Herzau’s own home, there was more ironic example when his young son’s pet mouse Willy died recently, it was accorded a tearful ceremonial burial in garden. Yet even as they mourned Willy, says Herzau, he and his wife were setting snap traps to kill the pest mice in their kitchen with the bare change in labels from pet to pest, the kitchen mice obtained totally different moral standards

  Questions:

  26, What does the passage say about most of the mice used for experiments?

  27, Why did the so-called bad mice have to be captured and destroyed?

  28, When are mice killed without prior approval?

  29, Why does the speaker say what the Herzau’s did at home is ironical?

  Passage Two

  There are roughly three New Yorks. There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born here, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size and its turbulence as natural and inevitable. Second, there is the New York of the commuter - the city that is swallowed up by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third, there is the New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these three trembling cities the greatest is the last, the city of final destination, the city that has a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York's high-strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness; natives give it solidity and continuity; but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from Italy to set up a small grocery store in a slum, or a young girl arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh eyes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company.

  Questions 30 to 32 are based on the passage you have just heard.

  30. What does the speaker say about the natives of New York?

  31. What does the speaker say commuters give to New York?

  32. What do we learn about the settlers of New York?

  Passage Three

  “If you asked me television is unhealthy”, I said to my roommate Walter, as I walked into the living room.“While you are sitting passively in front of the TV set, your muscles are turning to fat, your complexion is fading, and your eyesight is being ruined.”

  “Shh~”Walter put his finger to his lips, “This is an intriguing murder mystery.”

  “Really?” I replied.

  “But you know, the brain is destroyed by TV viewing. Creativity is killed by that box. And people are kept from communicating with one another. From my point of view, TV is the cause of the declining interest in school and the failure of our entire educational system.”

  “Ah ha, I can’t see your point.” Walter said softly. “But see? The woman on the witness stand in this story is being questioned about the murder that was committed one hundred years ago.”

  Ignoring his enthusiastic description of the plot, I went on with my argument.

  “As I see it,” I explained, “not only are most TV programs badly written and produced, but viewers are also manipulated by the mass media. As far as I am concerned, TV watchers are cut off from reality from nature, from the other people, from life itself! I was confident in my ability to persuade.

  After a short silence, my roommate said, “Anyway, I’ve been planning to watch the football game. I am going to change the channel.”

  “Don’t touch that dial!” I shouted, “I wanted to find out how the mystery turns out!”

  I am not sure I got my point to cross.

  Questions 33- 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

  33. As the speaker walked into the living room, what was being shown on TV?

  34. What does the speaker say about watching television?

  35. What can we say about the speaker?

  Section C Compound Dictation

  In the past, one of the biggest disadvantages of machines has been their inability to work on a micro scale. For example, doctors did not have devices allowing them to go inside the human body to detect health problems or to perform delicate surgery. Repair crews did not have a way of identifying broken pipes located deep within a high-rise apartment building. However, that’s about to change. Advances in computers and biophysics have started a micro miniature revolution that allows scientists to envision and in some cases actually build microscopic machines. These devices promise to dramatically change the way we live and work.

  Micromachines already are making an impact. At Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, research scientists have designed a 4-inch silicon chip that holds 700 tiny primitive motors. At Lucas Nova Sensor in Fremont, California, scientists have perfected the world’s first microscopic blood-pressure sensor. Threaded through a person’s blood vessels, the sensor can provide blood pressure readings at the valve of the heart itself.

  Although simple versions of miniature devices have had an impact, advanced versions are still several years away.

  Auto manufacturers, for example, are trying to use tiny devices that can sense when to release an airbag and how to keep engines and breaks operating efficiently. Some futurists envision nanotechnology also being used to explore the deep sea in small submarine, or even to launch finger-sized rockets packed with micro miniature instruments.

  “There is an explosion of new ideas and applications,” So, when scientists now think about future machines doing large and complex tasks, they’re thinking smaller than ever before.

  仔细阅读

  A recurring criticism of the UK's university sector is its perceived weakness in translating new knowledge into new products and services.

  Recently, the UK National Stem Cell Network warned the UK could lose its place among the world leaders in stem cell research unless adequate funding and legislation could be assured, despite an annual £40m spend by the Department of Health on all kinds of research.

  We should take this concern seriously as universities are key in the national innovation system and, in the face of the current economic turmoil, one of the few 'get out of jail' cards still held by the nation.

  However, we do have to challenge the unthinking complaint that the sector does not do enough in taking ideas to market. The most recent comparative data on the performance of universities and research institutions in Australia, Canada, USA and UK shows that, from a relatively weak starting position, the UK now leads on many indicators of commercialisation activity.

  Our weaknesses show up in the rates of US patenting and license income arising from our efforts, but these have improved and there is no reason to believe that this trend will not be continued.

  完形填空

  Part V Cloze

  The Truth About Plastic

  By BRYAN WALSH Thursday, July 10, 2008 (Time magazine)

  If you know where to find a good plastic-free shampoo, can you tell Jeanne Haegele? Last September, the 28-year-old Chicago resident 62. resolved to cut plastics out of her life. The marketing coordinator was concerned about 63. what the chemicals coming out of some common types of plastic might be doing to her body. She was also worried about the damage all the plastic 64. rubbish was doing to the environment. So she 65. hopped on her bike and rode to the nearest grocery store to see what she could find that didn't 66. include plastic. "I went in and 67. barely bought anything," Haegele says. She did 68. purchase some canned food and a carton (纸盒) of milk---69. only to discover later that both containers were 70. lined with plastic resin(树脂). "Plastic," she says, "just seemed like it was in everything."

  She's right. Back in the 1960s, plastic was well 71. on its way to becoming a staple of American life. The U.S. produced 28 million tons of plastic waste in 2005--27 million tons of which 72. ended up in landfills. Our food and water come 73. wrapped in plastic. It's used in our phones and our computers, the cars we drive and the planes we ride in. But the 74. infinitely adaptable substance has its dark side. Environmentalists fret about the petroleum needed to make it. Parents worry about the possibility of 75.toxic chemicals making their way from 76. household plastic into children's bloodstreams. Which means Haegele isn't the only person trying to cut plastic out of her life--she isn't 77. even the only one blogging about this kind of 78. endeavor. But those who've tried know it's 79. far from easy to go plastic-free. "These things seem to be so common 80. that it is practically impossible to avoid coming into 81. contact with them," says Frederick vom Saal, a biologist at the University of Missouri.

  翻译

  Part VI Translation

  1. You shouldn't have run across the road without looking, you would have been knocked down by a car. (也许会被车撞到)

  2 By no means does he regarded himself as an expert, (他把自己当成专家)although he knows a lot about the field.

  3 He doesn't appreciate the sacrifice his friends have made for him, however, he takes it for granted.(把他们所做的视作理所应当)

  4 Janet told me that she would rather her mother not have interfered with her marriage.(不干涉她的婚姻)

  5 To keep up with the expanding frontiers of scholarship. Edward Wilson found himself always searching for information on the internet. (经常上网查信息)

  答案

  快速阅读

  1. Google claims its plan for the world’s biggest online library is _____

  【答案】B. to serve the interest of the general public

  2. According to Santiago de la Mora, Google’s book-scanning project will

  【答案】B. broaden humanity’s intellectual horizons

  3. Opponents of Google Books believe that digitally archiving the world's books should be controlledby_______.

  【答案】C. non-profit organizations

  4.【答案】D. the copyright of the books it scanned

  5. 【答案】B. the online display of in-copyright books is not for commercial use

  6.【答案】 B. It was settle after more than two years of negotiation.

  7. 【答案】D. The commercial provision of the settlement

  8. 【答案】Providing information for free

  9. 【答案】orphan works

  10. 【答案】change the world’s book market

  Section A

  11.【答案】A) Listen to the recorded notes while driving.

  12.【答案】C) The man lacks confidence in playing the part.

  13.【答案】A) Arranging a bed for a patient

  14.【答案】A) He is too busy to accept more responsibility.

  15. 【答案】C) He has left his position in the government.

  16. 【答案】D) The man is well informed about the space shuttle missions.

  17. 【答案】A) At a car renting company

  18. : What did the man do over the weekend?

  【答案】A) He listened to some serious music.

  19: What kind of business does the man engaged in?

  【答案】B) Selling products made for left-handers.

  20: What does the man say about his stock of products?

  【答案】D) Most of them are specially made for his shop.

  21: What does the man say about other people in his line of business?

  【答案】D) They sell by mail order only.

  22: What do we learn about the man’s company?

  【答案】C)It sponsors trade fairs.

  23: Why was the campaign delayed according to the man?

  【答案】C)The woman's company made last-minute changes.

  24: What does the woman propose as a solution to the problem?

  【答案】D) Cut the fee by half for this year.

  25: What does the man suggest they do at the end of the conversation?

  【答案】D)Reflect on their respective mistakes.

  26. What does the passage say about most of the mice used for experiments?

  【答案】D)They sacrifice their lives for the benefit of humans.

  27 Why did the so-called bad mice have to be captured and destroyed?

  【答案】C) They may affect the results of experiments.

  28 When are mice killed without prior approval?

  【答案】C) When they become escapees.

  29 Why does the speaker say what the Herzau’s did at home is ironical?

  【答案】A)While holding a burial ceremony for a pet mouse, they were killing pest mice.

  30. What does the speaker say about the natives of New York?

  【答案】D) They take it for granted.

  31. What does the speaker say commuters give to New York?

  【答案】A) Tidal restlessness.

  32. What do we learn about the settlers of New York?

  【答案】B) They are adventurers from all over the world.

  33. As the speaker walked into the living room, what was being shown on TV?

  【答案】D) A murder mystery

  34. What does the speaker say about watching television?

  【答案】C)It is unhealthy for the viewers.

  35. What can we say about the speaker?

  【答案】B) He can’t resist the temptation of T.V. either.

  (36)detect   (37)delicate   (38) identifying (39)apartment

  (40) revolution (41) dramatically  42) primitive  (43)vessels

  (44)Although simple versions of miniature devices have had an impact, advanced versions are still several years away.

  (45) that can sense when to release an airbag and how to keep engines and breaks operating efficiently.

  (46)when scientists now think about future machines doing large and complex tasks, they’re thinking smaller than ever before.

  仔细阅读

  Section A

  47. values, abilities and strengths

  48. doing the right things

  49. positive mental attitude

  50. manage themselves

  51. trust

  Section B

  Passage One

  53. A It indicates that economic activities in the US have increased.

  54. C Producers of agricultural goods and raw materials

  55. C People’s reluctance to spend

  56. B To increase their market share overseas.

  Passage Two

  57. A. they still have a place among the world leaders.

  58. B. It does not reflect the differences among universities.

  59. A. concentration of resources in a limited number of universities.

  60. A. Fully utilize their research to benefit all sectors of society.

  61. C. By promoting the efficiency of technology transfer agencies.

  完形填空

  62:resolved

  63:what

  64:essence

  65:hopped

  66:include

  67:barely

  68:purchase

  69:merely

  70:combined

  71:on

  72:ended up

  73:wrapped

  74:infinitely

  75:toxic

  76:household

  77:even

  78:endeavor

  79:far

  80:that

  81:contact

  翻译

  1. You shouldn't have run across the road without looking, you would have been knocked down by a car. (也许会被车撞到)

  解析:本题考察虚拟语气。句子是与过去事实相反,因此用would have +过去分词,表虚拟语气。

  2 By no means does he regarded himself as an expert, (他把自己当成专家)although he knows a lot about the field.

  解析:本题考察倒装和词组regard sb. as sth.(把…当作…)。介词短语by no means 置于句首,构成部分倒装,因此把助动词does提前。

  3 He doesn't appreciate the sacrifice his friends have made for him, however, he takes it for granted.(把他们所做的视作理所应当)

  解析:本题考察词组take sth. for granted (把…当作理所当然)。同时,考生要注意句子后半句前是一个逗号,要加上一个连词and或者加上however。

  4 Janet told me that she would rather her mother not have interfered with her marriage.(不干涉她的婚姻)

  解析:本题考察would rather have done sth, 表示过去事件,句子中told提示是过去发生的事,因此用would have interfered with。

  5 To keep up with the expanding frontiers of scholarship. Edward Wilson found himself always searching for information on the internet. (经常上网查信息)

  解析:本题考察了感官动词find+宾语+现在分词(作宾补),现在分词表主动。因此这里用searching。

 

 

 

 

 

内容相关:

  • 2012年6月六级听力试题(word版
  • 2012年6月六级作文范文(文都
  • 2012年6月六级作文范文(高分
  • 收藏 推荐 打印 | 录入:Zoe913 | 阅读:0 次
    六级 
    相关文章
    英语评论请尽量用-纯英文-来评论吧!
    表情: 姓名: 字数
    点评:
    英文歌曲
    推荐英语学习